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Dior Tag

5 Sep

DIOR’S SADDLE-BAG IS BACK

Inspired by the bursts of creativity that defined the year 1968, when the rules of fashion were turned upside down, Dior’s creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri channeled such thoughts when piecing together the Autumn/Winter 2018-2019 ready-to-wear collection. Guided by this attitude advocating a search for authenticity and a willingness to ruffle fashion’s feathers and tear down established codes, the gorgeous saddle bags of this collection are no exception. Inspired by both this desire for freedom and the Maison’s heritage, the saddle bag historically made its debut in the Spring/Summer 2000 ready-to-wear collection, designed in 1999 by John Galliano (then creative director of Dior), bowing down to the world of equestrianism, with its form mimicking a horse saddle decorated with a gild...
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6 May

The Making of The Embroidered Book Tote Bag

Presented at the Spring-Summer 2018 Ready-to-Wear show, this version of the Dior Book Totebag carried by one of the models lends a laidback and summery allure. Its shimmering colors and graphic motifs are inspired by Mexican crafts. In total, over fifteen shades of green, orange, red, fuchsia, violet and blue clash and combine to form a uniquely hypnotic design. Conceived and developed in the house’s design studio in Paris, this fully-embroidered bag was produced in a family-run atelier located in the region of Umbria, also known as “Italy’s green heart”.   A single bag requires more than thirty-two hours of work and over one million two hundred thousand stitches. In addition, this bag necessitated three different kinds of embroidery stitch....
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29 Apr

Settles Down with Dior Matte Pre-Fall 2018

Several seasons of aesthetic upheaval have given way to classic, traditional looks from Dior   A lot has been happening on the aesthetic front at Dior in the past several seasons. Celebrated designer Raf Simons left unexpectedly and took his sleek, feminine futurism with him, after which the brand appointed Maria Grazia Chiuri, half of the duo responsible for Valentino's gangbusters success over the last decade. It was immediately clear that Chiuri's vision for Dior was different from Simons' in many ways: it was far more casual, it had a decidedly more vintage feel, even the use of color was world's apart. (Simons tended toward brights or pastels in his time at Dior; Chiuri prefers dark neutrals, theming an entire recent collection around navy.) In that...
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